Dust and cancer

A new report from Duke University finds an explanation for increases in the frequency of thyroid cancer in household dust. “Thyroid cancer is the fastest increasing cancer in the U.S., with most of the increase in new cases being papillary thyroid cancer” [PTC], said the study’s lead investigator, Julie Ann Sosa, M.D., MA, professor of […]

via Flame retardants, household dust, and thyroid cancer — CRAIN’S COMMENTS

Discrimination in Healthcare — CRAIN’S COMMENTS

45% of patients with advanced rectal cancer don’t receive the recommended treatment for this disease. Rectal cancer is a problem. Forecasts call for 39,000 new cases of this type of cancer in the US by the end of this year. Rectal cancer is the largest subcategory of colorectal cancer, and is the second leading cause […]

via Discrimination in Healthcare — CRAIN’S COMMENTS

What happened to Burlington County?

The good news is that New Jerseyans have access to remarkably good health care.  With the close proximity to medical centers in New York City and Philadelphia (and even Boston and Baltimore) the care available to citizens of The Garden State far surpasses what’s available to most Americans.

The bad news is that four of the 21 counties in NJ are cancer hot spots.  The worse news is that the hot spots are changing.

The enduring hot spot is scenic Cape May.  With a legacy of industrial pollution and being downwind from Delaware chemical factories, it has had problems and continues to do so.

The list used to include Ocean, Salem and Gloucester Counties.  Cancer incidence seems to have subsided in some of these areas.

The new entrant to the list is Burlington County.  Further research is required to see if there is a clustering around Ft. Dix and McGuire AFB or if the problem is more generally distributed.

Current incidence of cancer in NJ is shown in the chart below.  The chart is based on all cancer types/site for both males and females and all age groups.

Remarkably, the old industrial cities of NJ report relatively low cancer rates.  Of course, that could be attributed in part due to other environmental issues in those areas that can cause death before cancer develops.

As I find more interesting findings, they will be reported in subsequent blogs.

NJStateCancerProfilesMap